Chaos Cipher
‘you’ve seen what those Blue Lycans can
do. We all have! We don’t know enough about the Olympian race,
there’s a reason they’re illegal.’

    Dak’s eyes
flared as he regarded Boris and he folded his arms
confidently.
    ‘ You wanna
talk to me about race?’ he challenged. ‘I know something about
discrimination, my white brother. Those Olympians were mutilated to
begin with, their genes mutilated, their figures distorted, as
though denied their humanity, all in the name of deep-space
hibernation projects.’
    Boris,
increasingly uncomfortable, muttered something unintelligible and
shifted on his leg.
    ‘ I’ve lived
with enough stereotyping in the hardlands to recognise what follows
once a person is dehumanised. But you need to remember, Boris.’ He
reminded him. ‘The human race is one race, not a different set of
species. A lot’a folk don’t like hearing it, a’right, but it’s
gotta be heard.’
    ‘ We are a
home for those who need one,’ Sonja added in agreement. ‘We don’t
struggle here for anything. We make happen what is possible and
turn nobody away. Why should we start now?’
    There was a
long silence, but Boris felt the need to push again, just to be
sure.
    ‘ But Sonja,’
he started, ‘these Olympian Genetics are illegal. They’re rated
more deadly on the Atominii listings than nukes. This isn’t about
race. Maybe it’s just their culture to be violent.’
    ‘ Ah Boris,’
Sonja sighed, ‘violent compared with who? Other humans? Do you
think violence is because of a culture or religion? There’re none
more violence than the Atominii. And who cares what the Atominii
say? They also believe we, so called precariats are not post-human
enough to have the right to access fresh water.’ And Sonja gently
eased the baby back inside his pod. ‘Anyone unable to survive in
the Atominii’s luxurious vanity and fame are reduced to being human at
best, which is bad enough. As though it’s some sort of sin or
punishment. They say what they want and why should we care? We owe
the Titans nothing and we’re doing fine here without
them.’
    ‘ Well I
propose we at least let our community know,’ said Boris. ‘I mean,
finding a baby is a great thing. But finding an Olympian puts a
different spin on it. People might feel threatened.’
    ‘ And why
should it put a different spin on it?’ she challenged further.
‘Would Cerise Timbers abandon me for having Japanese and Anglican
blood ties? Would they abandon Dak for being black? Would they
abandon you for being an ex-Atominii plutocrat?’ Sonja then smiled
warmly. ‘Taking in an Olympian is a middle finger to the Atominii
and its laws and to hell with them I say. I’m with Dak. There’s
only one race on this planet. Whether it’s wired with neurophases
or nanome upgrades or not. Call them what you want. In the end
we’re all people.’
    ‘ But you’re
giving them a reason to destroy us,’ Boris pressed further.
‘Sonja…this is a big issue. It affects everyone regardless of what
we believe to be right as a whole. Ordinarily I’d say of course
keep the kid, but this is not an ordinary situation. We have to
inform our local federation and let people know.’
    ‘ We will,’
she prudently assured, ‘right now. And I’ll remind people that we
are one race. The Atominii have us on their damn hit list anyway. Who is the
coordinator this season, is it Enaya?’
    ‘ Yeah.’ Dak
nodded. ‘Enaya Chahuán.’
    ‘ Let’s talk
with Enaya about informing East B’ One locals and register an
appeal to keep the Olympian baby. We’ve got a good argument Dak. We
don’t agree with the Atominii. They’re willing to condemn us for
our humanity, let’s remind them how they lost their
own.’
    ‘ What if it
comes to abandoning the child?’ Dak confidently opined, leaning
closer to her. ‘What if people don’t want to risk that?’
    ‘ We might say
no Sonja.’ Boris added.
    ‘ Are you
afraid?’ Sonja asked, regarding Boris with a

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